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Frequently Asked Questions

General Eye FAQs

Normal vision is achieved when light is focused by the cornea and lens, at the front of the eye and the image falls on the retina at the back of the eye, which acts like a film in the camera.

Deviations from this are referred to as ‘refractive errors’, and the vast majority of these can be corrected with spectacles, contact lenses or surgery.

Myopia is the technical term for short sightedness, which means being able to see objects at close range, but distant and even mid range objects would be blurred.

Myopia occurs when the image does not reach the retina and actually falls short of it (or in front of it). This happens when the eye is too long for the refractive and focusing power of the cornea and the lens. Light rays bend more than they should, so they focus in front of the retina.

Hyperopia is the technical term for long sightedness, which means being able to see distances clearly, but close up images will be blurred.

If the eye is too short for the refractive power of the cornea and lens, the image produced will be focused beyond the retina. Consequently, the person will be able to see distances clearly, but close up images will be blurred. Light rays bend less than they should, so the focused image lies behind the retina.

Astigmatism is the irregular curvature of the eye resulting in blurred vision at both near and distance.

Astigmatism is caused by irregularities in the curvature of the parts of the eye responsible for focusing light rays (the cornea and the lens). An even curve (a round eye) results in even distribution of the light rays making up an image, which will be clear. If the curvature of the eye is uneven (rugby ball shaped), light rays will be unevenly distributed, causing blurred images at distance and at near.

Presbyopia develops when the natural lens cannot change its shape as much resulting in objects near to the eye becoming more blurred.

From the age of 45, it is common for people to wear reading glasses. This is due to the natural lens in the eye becoming less flexible. As a result, people tend to hold their print further away to read and eventually, reading glasses, bifocals or varifocals are needed. Long-sighted people may be affected more quickly than short-sighted people who may benefit for a short period by being able to read without spectacles.

Consultation FAQs

A consultation prior to making a decision about laser eye surgery is essential, mainly to determine your suitability and talk through all possible options and outcomes. Unlike some high street clinics, we do not use a consultation to give you a sales pitch. With LaserVision, you will always see a specialist Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon who will thoroughly assess your eyes to determine your suitability for vision correction treatment. If you are suitable, your consultant will then talk with you at length about what treatment options are recommended for your eyes. This will also allow you to discuss the benefits, affordability and all the facts before making your decision.

Our consultants will give you honest, expert advice, and will make you aware of all possible outcomes. As specialists in complex corneal and intra-ocular surgery, the surgeons at LaserVision may be able to offer alternative treatment if laser surgery is deemed not suitable.

No, but vision correction treatments are increasingly popular. Our Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeons are always in demand but we aim to accommodate you as soon as possible, usually within 1-2 weeks. However, sometimes we are busier than usual and you may have to wait a little longer.

To book a consultation at your nearest LaserVision clinic, simply enquire online here [http://www.laservision.co.uk/contact-us/} or call us on freephone 0800 024 8888.

Your laser consultation can take up to two hours. You can return to work after this, but do not drive as we will have to use drops to dilate your pupils and this can make your vision blurry and light sensitive. We recommend you bring a pair of sunglasses.

We do not recommend you drive as we will use drops to dilate your pupils, and this can make your vision blurred and light sensitive. 

Prior to your initial assessment, it is essential to leave out your contact lenses for a period of 1 week if they are soft contact lenses and for 4 weeks if they are rigid contact lenses. This is imperative for accurate assessment of the cornea prior to treatment and for correct planning of your surgery.

We would advise that you do not wear eye make up to your consultation.

Treatment can start no earlier than five days after consultation as it allows you to consider your decision to proceed as we feel it should not be rushed into.

No. Our Consultants just use their expertise to give an honest opinion of what is best for you and your eyes. We will never pressurise anyone into treatment or phone you with offers trying to persuade you into treatment. This is a lifestyle operation to improve quality of life and it is not essential. We also welcome anyone who has been seen elsewhere and wishes to come for a second opinion.

Laser Eye Surgery FAQs

Laser eye surgery is an operation, which aims to reduce dependence on glasses or contact lenses by correcting vision using an excimer laser. During the ten minute surgery the laser reshapes the cornea of the eye in a predetermined manner to improve unaided vision. The two most common types of laser eye surgery are LASIK and LASEK, although there are several other types of refractive surgery that can improve your vision when laser surgery is not the most appropriate option.

We offer a range of different laser eye treatments including LASIK, LASEK and SMILE.

LASIK is the most well known form of laser eye surgery performed. A femtosecond laser creates a flap which is gently lifted so that the cornea can be reshaped using an excimer laser. This gives patients a rapid visual recovery.

LASEK is suitable for people with less serious eye focusing problems, thin corneas or dry eyes who may not be able to have LASIK. Instead of creating a flap, the fine surface of the cornea is loosened and folded back; the cornea is then reshaped using the excimer laser.

SMILE stands for Small Incision Lenticule Extraction. In this procedure, no flap is created; the cornea is reshaped through the removal of a piece of corneal tissue through a keyhole procedure. His procedure is suitable for higher prescriptions and ideal for patients with thin corneas.

Laser surgical procedures are very quick.

LASEK takes in the order of 4-5 minutes per eye, whilst LASIK can take up to 10 minutes per eye due to the extra time required for creating a flap. SMILE takes approximately ten minutes per eye.

This decision always rests with the patient after considering the pros and cons. LASIK and LASEK is performed bilaterally simultaneously in approximately 95% of the patients we treat (i.e. both eyes same day).

Most people start noticing an improvement in vision almost immediately. After LASIK you will normally be able to see without glasses or contact lenses within twenty four hours. With LASEK the visual recovery is slower but by day 5 most patients are seeing well.

The laser has an eye-tracker that will track each and every small movement that your eye makes. The laser only fires when the eye is perfectly in position so there is no chance of your looking around affecting the procedure. The good news is that most people find it very easy to keep the eye still by focusing on the target fixation light.

The procedure itself is painless. However, the eyes may feel a bit gritty after LASIK for a few hours, but there is no pain. 

Technology and expertise have advanced a great deal in recent years, meaning vision correction is now available to a much wider range of people with even the most complex of refractive errors. Our consultation includes a number of tests which will determine both your suitability for treatment and help you decide on which is best suited to your personal needs and expectations.

There are various types of laser vision correction, and the right procedure is always determined based on a number of factors including your age, refractive error prescription and lifestyle.

There are no hidden costs. The fee in which we quote at your consultation is completely inclusive of treatment, post-operative care, follow up visits for 12months and any necessary enhancements.

The vast majority of people obtain at least 20/20 vision, and every one obtains legal driving vision.

There are varying factors which could effect your end results which include:
• History of Lazy eye (amblyopia)
• Dry eyes
• Other eye pathology such as cataract, keratoconus, and retinal changes.

Laser surgery can last many decades or for life especially treatment for myopia (short sight), however the results of laser eye surgery can depend on a host of varying factors which include:
• Age at time of surgery.
• Whether the eye has any other pathology.
• The health of the cornea, the retina and the lens.
• Ocular surface health – dry eye etc
• Degree of prescription treated. Low treatments are generally more stable where as high prescriptions have a chance of regressing – LaserVision consultants monitor patients with high prescriptions and can perform ‘enhancement’ procedures if required, so this isn’t a problem.

This is often the main concern for people. The first thing to remember is that all surgery has risks and complications. The risks of having a complication from heart or orthopaedic surgery vary from surgeon to surgeon and hospital to hospital. All risks will be carefully explained at your consultation.

When laser eye surgery is performed in clinics like Laser Vision, the risks of developing a sight threatening complication is 8 times lower than wearing daily disposable contact lenses. To date, we have never had a sight threatening complication.

There are many other options available if laser surgery is found not to be suitable by your Consultant Surgeon. You may be suitable for Phakic ICL (Implantable contact lens) surgery or Refractive Lens Exchange surgery. Patients looking to correct their near vision may also be suitable for KAMRA™ Inlay surgery.

There are always some potential risks and complications and it is imperative that these are well understood. 

Minor Complications

Mild dry eye – Some people experience mild to moderate dry eye symptoms after LASIK. Occasional use of lubricating eye drops may be required. Some people need to use these regularly. By 3-6 months the eyes are usually back to normal. Under correction – If the refraction is not fully corrected and it causes a problem then an enhancement procedure can usually correct it, if there is enough corneal thickness to safely do more treatment. Enhancement treatments are generally done 3-6 months after the initial procedure, once vision has stabilised. Over correction – An initial overcorrection is expected for high corrections and in hyperopia. It usually regresses in the first 3 months. If overcorrection persists then enhancement surgery can be done, if it is safe to do so. Induced astigmatism – Can usually be corrected with enhancement surgery. Regression – As time goes on, a small proportion of eyes may slowly heal in a way that moves the prescription towards an under correction. This can usually be corrected with enhancement surgery. Light sensitivity – In the first few days some people will be sensitive to light. Pain – About 5% of patients say they have some mild pain after LASIK that can be relieved with pain relief tablets and usually resolves by 4-5 hours. Night vision problems – In the first few weeks following surgery about 10% may experience halos around lights at night time. This effect should fade. By twelve months this should only effect around 3%, generally those who started with a high correction. Haze – Some eyes develop faint haze in the interface between the flap and corneal bed that is maximal at 3-6 months and fades away by 12 months. It is very rare for this to affect vision. Interface debris – Minor debris in the interface is not uncommon. It very rarely affects vision and if it does can usually be removed. Corneal abrasion during the procedure – In some people the surface layer of cells on the cornea are looser than average and can be dislodged resulting in a surface abrasion. Over the following 2-3 days the abrasion will heal.

Important Complications

Loss of best-corrected vision – Following surgery if the vision in an eye cannot be corrected with lenses to the same line on the eye chart as before the surgery then this is called loss of best-corrected vision. Anything that affects the optical quality of the cornea can cause it. The chance of this happening is currently about 1 in 500. Corneal ectasia (bulging) – If there is too much tissue removed from the cornea it may lose its structural strength and start to bulge outwards. It can be eliminated by careful measurement of the thickness of the cornea. This is extremely rare, probably less than 1 in several thousand. Good screening and accurate assessment with a Pentacam will help avoid this. Progression from sub-clinical to true keratoconus (conical cornea) – This may occur if the most subtle signs of keratoconus are not detected with the corneal mapping (topography). With the use of the gold standard Pentacam topography this is very rare, probably less than 1 in several thousand. Severe dry eye – It is not uncommon for the eye to be slightly dry after laser surgery and most recover very quickly. If there is a predisposition to dryness, the eye may take longer to recover. Dry eye is more common with LASIK than LASEK. Epithelial ingrowth – Significant growth of the front cell layer (epithelial cells) between the flap and the bed. This occurs in less than 1 in 2000 eyes. This can only potentially occur in LASIK and not in LASEK. Diffuse lamellar keratitis – In rare cases there is movement of inflammatory cells into the interface between the flap and the bed. This can rarely result in the cornea becoming an irregular shape. Severe cases that affect vision occur in about 1 in 2000 cases. Most resolve with time. Again, this can only occur in LASIK and not in LASEK. Infection – Infection in the cornea following LASIK is extremely rare, about 1 in 10,000 cases. We are yet to have an infection in any of our cases to date. Problems cutting the flap – “Partial flaps”, “Irregular flaps” or “Buttonholes” are all cases where a perfect flap is not achieved. The chance of this occurring with a microkeratome is about 1 in 500. With LASEK, there is no flap to create, so this problem is eliminated.

At Laser Vision, we treat many complex patients, including those who require laser surgery for other reasons than vision correction. Some of these patients will never see 20/20 so when including these patients in our data, they will skew the results.

Enhancement surgery is additional treatment to “fine tune” the result. It takes one to three months from the initial surgery for the vision to be stable. During this time there may be some minor fluctuations in your vision. There is a lot of individual variation in the rate and amount that people heal. If after three months there is some under or over correction, the surgeons at Laser Vision can offer you some additional laser to optimise the outcome, providing it is safe to do so. Generally enhancement surgery is more likely in higher or more complicated corrections. Enhancements are only needed in about 1% of cases of low short-sightedness. For higher corrections (over -8.0) there is a greater chance that an enhancement may be required. The overall rate of enhancement surgery following LASIK is about 4%. Enhancements are done free of charge within twelve months of the initial procedure as we want you to be happy with the final outcome.

The laser treatment, including immediate post-treatment time, will be around 2 hours. We would not recommend you returning to work on the day of treatment. Many return to work two days later but this will depend on the type of treatment you have and type of work you do.

Each aftercare appointment can take up to one hour. If you have LASIK treatment we will see you the following day. Your next aftercare appointment will be one week following treatment. You will be then be seen at intervals determined by your Consultant Ophthalmologic Surgeon. If you have LASEK treatment we will see you 3-7 days following your treatment. Your next aftercare appointment will then be arranged for the following week, then at intervals determined by your consultant ophthalmologist.

Everybody’s eyes are different. Usually, you can drive the following day after LASIK or intraLASIK and 7 days after LASEK or SupraLASE. However, you should not drive until your vision meets the driving standards. Our Consultant Ophthalmologists will test your vision and confirm this at your aftercare appointments.

Depending on your treatment, there are around 5-6 recommended aftercare appointments. On average this will take around four months. When you are discharged from our care you will be sent a discharge summary. You need to keep for in a safe place as it may be required in the future. When we have discharged you we will write to your doctor (GP).

On the day of treatment you should not wear any make up at all, as this may affect the accuracy of the laser. The eye area will be cleaned by nursing staff prior to treatment to ensure the area is cleaned effectively. 

We would also recommend that you do not wear eye make up for up to 4 weeks after surgery.

Please discuss with your Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon when you can resume sporting activities. Swimming is not recommended for 6 weeks after LASIK treatment and up to 4 weeks after LASEK treatment.

We would recommend not flying for 2 to 3 days after laser eye surgery (this includes both long- haul and short-haul flights). This is due to the dry atmosphere inside an aeroplane. When you do fly please make sure you use plenty of artificial tears.

This depends on your own recovery rate, but allow at least 24 to 48 hours, and it could be up to a week. If you must use your PC, then remember to blink frequently and use the drops provided.

They have laser eye surgery with well-respected experienced colleagues with a proven track record and access to the most up-to-date effective technology. At Laservision, we have treated many doctors including our very own Mike Tappin.

We have treated pilots in the past and this has not been a problem. Often your employer may require a report after the treatment. You would need to clarify this with the Civil Aviation authority (CAA).

The police will generally accept applications from people who have undergone laser eye surgery after the elapse of 6-10 weeks, and provided there are no residual side-effects and other eyesight standards are met. Laser eye surgery treatments are generally acceptable for current employees, but check with your employer beforehand.

Some fire brigades will make allowances for those with laser vision correction. In most cases, you will have to wait 6 months after treatment before applying. Check with your local brigade. Laser eye surgery treatments are generally acceptable for current employees, but check with your superior beforehand.

Military police states that while laser eye procedures are not generally prohibited among serving recruits, there are rules covering its use. Please check with your superior.

As with any surgery, there is always a degree of risk, so it is not possible to guarantee 20/20 vision. The success of surgery depends on a number of factors including decision making during the consultation, the experience and expertise of the team treating you, and the aftercare provided. The surgery itself just forms part of the process to a successful outcome.

Laser surgery involves delicate care of the corneal structure during and after surgery and prior to surgery, there are a series of corneal measurements that need to be interpreted correctly to achieve the best outcome for you. Refractive surgery now encompasses a wide variety of techniques and it is imperative that the surgeon leading your care has the ability to deliver all aspects of refractive surgery – not just one type of treatment.

SMILE FAQs

Prior to the procedure, numbing drops are used to ensure there is no discomfort for our patients.

It uses the femtosecond laser to precisely separate and then remove a ‘lenticule’ (a very thin disc) of tissue to re-shape the cornea and change its lens power.

Like LASIK, the corneal surface layer remains largely untouched so ReLEx procedures share the same benefit of minimal post-operative discomfort and rapid visual recovery.  But because no excimer treatment is necessary, the laser procedure itself is quicker: there is no ablation.

The SMILE procedure makes laser vision correction more suitable for patients with higher prescriptions and thinner corneas and provides a reduced risk of ‘dry-eye’ symptoms post treatment.

KAMRA™ Treatment FAQs

The lens in your eye is stretchy and flexible. With time the lens stiffens. As a result it can no longer bend into the right shape to bring close objects into focus. To compensate, you end up moving objects further away at just the right distance to focus. This is why you start holding reading materials at arm’s length. The clinical term is presbyopia (prez-bee-‘O-pee-uh) and it happens to everyone eventually.

The KAMRA inlay helps restore near vision and reduce the constant frustrations of reading glasses for those with presbyopia or blurry near vision. By providing a natural range of vision you can see — from near to far. It also offers long-term performance to help you continue to enjoy clear vision over time, even as presbyopia progresses.

The KAMRA inlay sits in the first few layers of the eye known as the cornea. Smaller and thinner than a contact lens, the inlay is a mini-ring with an opening in the centre. By using this pinhole effect, the inlay focuses light coming into the eye. This restores near vision while maintaining your distance vision.

Regardless of when you lost your reading vision, the KAMRA inlay may be right for you. The first step in evaluation is to have a consultation and comprehensive eye exam. Following a series of specialised test, your consultant will discuss your suitability for this procedure.

The KAMRA inlay is ideal for individuals who have lost their near vision due to presbyopia and desire to do everyday activities without reading glasses. Presbyopia happens to almost everyone in their 40s or 50s when the eye’s natural lens becomes too stiff to focus up close.

The KAMRA inlay restores everyday vision so you can see text messages, a computer screen and the time on your wrist watch, without the frustration of reading glasses or contact lenses. It provides a natural range of vision – from near to far and offers long-term performance to help you enjoy clear near vision over time.

The amount of near vision improvement varies by individual. However, most patients can expect their near visual acuities to improve an average of three lines or more.  The images below illustrate the size of text patients were able to read before and after the KAMRA inlay.

You can help your eyes heal faster and improve your vision by:

  • Taking eye drops as prescribed
  • Avoiding reading glasses
  • Keeping all follow-up appointments

Your doctor will discuss your post-op healing process prior to your procedure.

No. Our Consultants just use their expertise to give an honest opinion of what is best for you and your eyes. We will never pressurise anyone into treatment or phone you with offers trying to persuade you into treatment. This is a lifestyle operation to improve quality of life and it is not essential. We also welcome anyone who has been seen elsewhere and wishes to come for a second opinion.

Cataract Surgery FAQs

Surgery is performed in theatre of a large hospital to ensure the safest possible outcomes.

During the surgery, patients will lie down on a bed and be covered in a drape to ensure a clean sterile environment. During the procedure, patients may experience a combination of bright lights and the feeling of cool water around the eye. The surgery is entirely comfortable as the eye is anaesthetised with drops. There are no sharp injections.

During surgery, the natural crystalline lens is replaced with a new bespoke intra-ocular lens. The average surgical time is between 5 and 12 minutes per eye.

No. The eye is anaesthetised with drops so patients do not experience any pain. However, it is not uncommon to be aware of a gentle pressure during surgery.

Patients recover within a matter of days following routine cataract surgery. Drops will be required for a period of one month following surgery.

Your surgeon will advise you on this as it depends on the nature of your job.

All surgery carries a degree of risk. Thankfully cataract surgery is very safe.

Published data demonstrates that complications occur in approximately one in 50 cases nationwide. Our surgeons however have extremely low complication rates with the figure being as low as 1 in 800 cases. Most of these complications are very minor and will settle with time.

Given the nature of the surgery, the most serious complication may harm the vision which is why we perform surgery on one eye at a time.

Implants have been present in eye surgery for nearly 70 years. They are extremely safe and are inert. Issues related to implants are extremely rare.

Your surgeon will guide you on the most appropriate lens style for your needs.

There are a variety of intra-ocular lenses including monofocal, toric, multifocal, extended depth, KAMRA technology and accommodative lenses available. The surgeon will guide you to the most appropriate lens for your needs.

With standard cataract surgery, monofocal lenses are used meaning patients often will remain dependent on glasses for reading vision, distance vision or both.

Please bring in your glasses and any recent prescriptions from your optician if available.

Most patients will have topical anaesthesia (eye drops only). For patients who are anxious about surgery, sedation and general anaesthesia are available options.

Prior to surgery, you will be admitted to the hospital by a nurse who will perform some routine checks in preparation for theatre. Your surgeon will meet you again, discuss the planned procedure and ask you sign a consent form. You will have plenty of opportunity to discuss any questions you may have at this stage. Drops or a pellet will be placed in the eye to dilate your pupil so that surgery can be carried out. This whole process often takes between 30-60 minutes.

After the procedure, patients will be given their post operative medication and be allowed to leave within half an hour following some final checks. For patients undergoing surgery under general anaesthesia this process may take longer as we ensure your full recovery prior to discharge.

Surgery is performed in theatre of a large hospital to ensure the safest possible outcomes.

During the surgery, patients will lie down on a bed and be covered in a drape to ensure a clean sterile environment. During the procedure, patients may experience a combination of bright lights and the feeling of cool water around the eye. The surgery is entirely comfortable as the eye is anaesthetised with drops. There are no sharp injections.

During surgery, the natural crystalline lens is replaced with a new bespoke intra-ocular lens. The average surgical time is between 5 and 12 minutes per eye.

Your eye will be protected by a clear shield. The eye should look normal but occasionally there may be a mild redness to the white of the eye.

The vision is often surprisingly good but patients may be aware of some early visual phenomenon such as haloes due to the pupil being artificially dilated.

The vision often improves immediately after surgery but given that the pupil is often dilated, it may take between 103 days for this to settle. Most patients will have driving vision within a matter of a few days.

As we perform surgery one eye at a time, patient may wish to remove the lens from the glasses on the operated side and continue to wear glasses between surgery. For patients with high prescriptions however, the use of one lens in the non-operated eye may make them feel unbalanced so the options are to not wear any glasses at all or to wear a contact lens in the non-operated eye.

No. Once a cataract is removed, it does not come back.

Refractive Lens Exchange FAQs

Lens Replacement surgery involves removing the natural crystalline lens and replacing it with an intra-ocular lens (IOL) implant to correct your vision.

There are different types of intra-ocular lenses and whether you can be completely glasses free depends on the lens. This treatment is essentially a development of cataract surgery but instead of removing a cloudy lens, a clear lens is removed and exchanged with an artificial lens (IOL) that is chosen specifically for your refractive error and visual needs.

This treatment is known by various clinics under different names like Clear Lens Exchange (CLE), Lens Exchange and Clarivu™. However, at LaserVision, we term this surgery Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE) which is the most recognised term for this surgery to avoid confusion.

Refractive Lens Exchange is not only able to correct all fields of vision leaving patients completely glasses free but means that cataracts will never develop in the future.

In patients over 50 years of age, Refractive Lens Exchange has major benefits over LASIK eye surgery, as it can correct refractive errors for people with serious vision problems. After an implant of a bespoke lens, need for prescription glasses or daily contact lenses may be completely eliminated, as intra-ocular lenses can correct all common vision errors such as near-sightedness, far-sightedness, astigmatism and presbyopia.

At LaserVision, we use the latest technology to achieve the best outcomes.  Following a thorough and detailed assessment with a team of optometrists and consultants, we measure the eye to 1/1000th mm and take 25000-point measurement of the surface of the eye to ensure the most accurate measurements possible.

As the visual outcomes are dependent on a surgical precision, we use the latest Ziemer Z8 Femtosecond laser technology to achieve unprecedented accuracy at the time of surgery in suitable patients.

The first lens was implanted in 1948 by Sir Harold Ridley in London. Evidently lens technology has evolved and continues to progress over the last 70 years.

Modern lens technology uses advanced optics from NASA derived technology to reduce aberrations and to optimise vision to the highest possible standards. Globally, there are 6 million lenses implanted every year and it is estimated that over 250 million lenses have been implanted  to date.

Surgery is performed in theatre of a large hospital to ensure the safest possible outcomes.

During the surgery, patients will lie down on a bed and be covered in a drape to ensure a clean sterile environment. During the procedure, patients may experience a combination of bright lights and the feeling of cool water around the eye. The surgery is entirely comfortable as the eye is anaesthetised with drops. There are no sharp injections.

During surgery, the natural crystalline lens is replaced with a new bespoke intra-ocular lens. The average surgical time is between 5 and 12 minutes per eye.

There are a variety of intra-ocular lenses including monofocal, toric, multifocal, extended depth, KAMRA technology and accommodative lenses available. The surgeon will guide you to the most appropriate lens for your needs.

Prior to surgery, you will be admitted to the hospital by a nurse who will perform some routine checks in preparation for theatre. Your surgeon will meet you again, discuss the planned procedure and ask you sign a consent form. You will have plenty of opportunity to discuss any questions you may have at this stage. Drops or a pellet will be placed in the eye to dilate your pupil so that surgery can be carried out. This whole process often takes between 30-60 minutes.

After the procedure, patients will be given their post operative medication and be allowed to leave within half an hour following some final checks. For patients undergoing surgery under general anaesthesia this process may take longer as we ensure your full recovery prior to discharge.

Your eye will be protected by a clear shield. The eye should look normal but occasionally there may be a mild redness to the white of the eye.

The vision is often surprisingly good but patients may be aware of some early visual phenomenon such as haloes due to the pupil being artificially dilated.

The vision often improves immediately after surgery but given that the pupil is often dilated, it may take between 103 days for this to settle. Most patients will have driving vision within a matter of a few days.

As we perform surgery one eye at a time, patient may wish to remove the lens from the glasses on the operated side and continue to wear glasses between surgery. For patients with high prescriptions however, the use of one lens in the non-operated eye may make them feel unbalanced so the options are to not wear any glasses at all or to wear a contact lens in the non-operated eye.

Laser Cataract /Lens Surgery

Laser cataract surgery uses femtosecond laser technology which incorporates an OCT imaging system that is used to create a detailed 3-D image of the inside of the eye, meaning the surgeon can plan, customise and perform the entire procedure with an unprecedented degree of precision and accuracy. Femtosecond lasers are accurate to within 1/1000th mm.

All laser platforms are designed using a system which requires the patient to position perfectly to fit the laser, which presents some challenges for patients as they get older. The Ziemer Z8 is unique in that the laser adapts to the patients position, meaning that the experience is comfortable and much easier to achieve success.

The other major benefit for the Ziemer Z8 is the laser is the lowest energy laser in the world, using nearly 100 times less energy per pulse to achieve the same outcomes as other lasers. By delivering this low energy nearly 1000 times quicker, the result is a faster, safer and more precise procedure meaning that your vision will recover quicker and with minimal inflammation.

No it does not. The standard lens extraction method is one of the most common surgical procedures in the world today. The laser cataract procedure simply brings a new level of tailored, reproducible precision.

With laser cataract surgery a 3-D model is created of your eye and biometric data is automatically calculated which is specifically tailored to your own eye. This makes the procedure extremely precise.

The laser is then used to create the incisions and soften the lens in a very precise way, using the 3-D image as a guide. In some cases, the use of femtosecond laser technology may also reduce the time it takes to remove your lens.

With the standard procedure, the steps are all performed manually.

Femtosecond laser technology was given approval in the United States and Europe in 2012, after many years of trials and testing, and has become a procedure now adopted by many of the world’s leading ophthalmology centres.

It is estimated that over 100,000 cataract procedure have now been performed with femtosecond laser.

Most patients are suitable for this technology, and as part of your initial consultation we undertake thorough diagnostic tests and check the health of your eye to ascertain if you are suitable.

The total laser cataract procedure takes around two minutes followed by the lens being removed by the surgeon and the new artificial lens being placed in your eye. The total time for the laser cataract procedure is roughly 10 minutes.

No. Laser cataract surgery technology was designed with patient comfort in mind, so you can relax, knowing you have the latest technology available to treat one of your most valuable senses – your sight. You may experience a little redness to the eye following surgery.

You may briefly see bright starlight images.

Keratoconus FAQs

Here at LaserVision, our expert Consultant Surgeons are not only specialists in laser eye surgery but lead the corneal service as specialists in complex corneal conditions including Keratoconus. With considerable expertise in the field of Keratoconus treatments, our Consultants are often sought after for their specific expertise. Our consultants have even lead he way in ground breaking new treatment and techniques for keratoconus.

There is range of treatment options available, which we can recommend after a thorough consultation with a consultant surgeon. Treatments available include specialist contact lenses, corneal segments, cross-linking, topographic guided customised ablation laser surgery and corneal graft surgery.

The procedure takes about 15 minutes and is done on an outpatient basis, but you will need someone to drive you home after surgery. Before surgery, your surgeon places anesthetizing drops in your eye and may give you a mild oral sedative.

During the procedure, your surgeon uses a femtosecond laser to create a channel between layers of the cornea, outside of the central optical zone. Your surgeon then chooses the appropriate ring thickness. A thicker ring in Intacs means more flattening of the cornea, which increases the level of vision correction achieved. After one or two crescent-shaped Intacs are inserted into the tunnel, the procedure is over.

You’ll probably rest for a while, then go home (have someone else drive you). Most people have sharper vision the first day after surgery, but you may need a couple of days of relaxation to promote healing. You won’t feel the ring segments, because they are beneath the cornea’s nerve endings. Other people can’t see them unless they look very closely into your eyes.

The ring segments flatten your cornea similarly to the way you can flatten the top of a tent by pushing on the sides.

Results of these implants will depend on the degree of keratoconus in each individual. People with milder cases of keratoconus may not need any lenses for additional vision correction. People with moderate keratoconus may require glasses or soft contact lenses for improved vision.

For more advanced cases, rigid gas permeable contact lenses may be needed to improve vision or to delay or prevent the need for a corneal transplant.

Intacs can be very effective at changing the cornea and flattening the cone caused by keratoconus. But if you have advanced keratoconus, Intacs cannot halt the progression caused by weakening of surface eye tissue (collagen) responsible for corneal strength.

In 58 keratoconus eyes implanted with Intacs, almost half (25) achieved 20/40 uncorrected vision or better in a study reported in the October 2005 issue of Archives of Ophthalmology. Studies also have shown that Intacs may be able to reduce vision distortions in people with keratoconus who also have developed irregular astigmatism associated with an uneven eye surface.

In another study, single-segment Intacs improved both uncorrected vision and lens corrected vision for LASIK eye surgery patients who developed keratoconus or progressive corneal thinning (ectasia) as a complication. Single-segment Intacs also were more effective than double-segment Intacs in the same study reported in the May 2006 issue of American Journal of Ophthalmology.

Among 28 people in the post-LASIK study, 37 eyes were treated with either single-segment or double-segment Intacs. Each group was matched for factors such as age. The single-segment group averaged about nine lines of uncorrected vision improvement on a standard eye chart, compared with 2.5 lines in the double-segment group.

A literature review of 452 patients who underwent Intacs corneal ring implantation for the correction of nearsightedness was published in the October 2001 issue of Ophthalmology.Twelve months after surgery, 97 percent of treated eyes had 20/40 vision or better, and 74 percent had 20/20 or better.

Just under 9 percent of patients requested to have their Intacs removed due to side effects such as glare, halos and night vision problems or because their vision was under- or over-corrected, and 3.8 percent required a secondary surgical procedure. There were no serious complications.

A study of the reversibility of Intacs for nearsightedness, published in the January 2001 issue of Journal of Refractive Surgery, found that 20 of the 21 eyes returned to within 1.0 diopter of their preoperative refraction, with stable vision three months after removal was performed safely and without complications.

If you are considering Intacs surgery for keratoconus, your first step is to have a comprehensive eye exam by an ophthalmologist who specializes in the procedure. He or she will examine your eyes and perform a number of measurements to determine if the procedure is likely to improve your vision.

If you are interested in Intacs corneal ring implantation for the correction of nearsightedness, you must be at least 21 years of age and have a stable eyeglasses prescription with no more than -3.0 diopters (D) of myopia and no more than 1.0 D of astigmatism.

After examining your eyes, your eye doctor can tell you more about Intacs. The cost of the procedure varies from surgeon to surgeon, but generally Intacs cost slightly more than laser vision correction.

The best way to determine if Intacs corneal implants are right for you is to consult a doctor who specialises in Intacs corneal implants, who can give you all the facts and evaluate your eyes.

No. Laser cataract surgery technology was designed with patient comfort in mind, so you can relax, knowing you have the latest technology available to treat one of your most valuable senses – your sight. You may experience a little redness to the eye following surgery.

You may briefly see bright starlight images.

Eyesight recovery is fast. The day after the surgery vision starts to get better and stabilizes after three months. During this first period of time, fluctuations in the sight happen. In the morning the patient sees well, but during the course of the day the sight may get a bit blurry. Since patients don’t undergo plastic surgery, prescription glasses or contact lenses could be needed to complete the correction. Meanwhile, eyesight can be good or slightly blurry.

There are very few risks. As with any other surgery, there may be an infection. In this case, the ring shall be removed. There is no risk of rejection from the body. The surgery does not damage or prevent a cornea transplant. The complications are minimal and, most important, reversible. This means the ring can be removed and the cornea recovers its original size.

The surgical procedure is performed as an outpatient procedure with the patient being awake. The eye is anaesthetised with anesthetic eye drops. At LaserVision, the channels are created using the Intralase Femtosecond laser for complete accuracy. The procedure is completely painless and it takes only 15 minutes. After the operation, a therapeutic contact lens is applied if required and is usually removed within 5 days. The use of antibiotic eye drops and anti-inflammatory allow a more conformable and safe postoperative period. After 3 days the patient can go back to his/hers usual activities.

No. The basic goal of the Ferrara Ring is the sight rehabilitation. Meanwhile, the ring implant may delay the evolution of the disease, avoiding the need of a cornea transplant for an undetermined period of time.

Most of the patients do not complain of night vision issues. Tests on night blindness and sensitivity of the eyes do not report such problem.

Close to 30% of the patients who undergo surgery need contact lenses and 40% need prescription glasses.

Since the cornea flattens after surgery, both in the centre and the periphery, the adaptation to contact lenses is better than before the operation.

Since the Ferrara Ring is a superficial implant, it can be removed and re-implanted. If the surgical procedure is not carried out properly, the operation can be repeated.

Complications are very rare. The index of ring removals is of as little as 4% after this type of surgery. An infection is the most serious complication the patient may face, and it may result on a cornea transplant. Fortunately, is seen as little as 0.08% of the times.

Surgical technique related complications such as a superficial implant that could originate a self-extraction of the ring or a bad placement of the segments that could cause astigmatism are rarely seen. Patient behavior related complications might happen when rubbing the eyes, since the segments of the ring could move, self-extract or cause an infection.

The advantages of ring are:

  • Fast recovery of the sight
  • The body does not reject the implant
  • If contact lenses are necessary, they adapt easily to the eye
    Reversibility
  • The ring delays or even stops the disease for an undetermined period of time

The implant of the intra-corneal ring flattens and regularizes the cornea. Therefore, it corrects deformities such as myopia or astigmatism. The ring can also be used as complementary to techniques such as laser or phakic lenses, to correct high degrees of myopia.

The success rate depends on the severity of the keracotone. The earlier the surgical procedure takes place, the more chances of success. Operations in the early stages are successful at a 95% rate.

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